Caverswall (St. Peter)

CAVERSWALL (St. Peter), a parish, in the union of Cheadle, N. division of the hundred of Totmonslow and of the county of Stafford, 3 miles (E.) from Longton; containing, with the township of Weston-Coyney with Hulme, 1505 inhabitants. The parish comprises 5346a. 2r. 11p., of which nearly 3300 acres are meadow and pasture, 1384 arable, 47 common or waste, and a considerable part woods and plantations. Fairs are held on the second Tuesdays in April and October, for horses, black-cattle, and swine. The most remarkable object in the village is a castle, founded by Sir William de Caverswall in the time of Edward II., and rebuilt in that of Elizabeth or James I.; it was garrisoned for the parliament in 1645, and at the commencement of the French revolution, in 1789, was purchased for the English Benedictine nuns of Ghent, about thirty in number, who had been driven from their possessions in Belgium. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at £7. 5. 3.; patron and impropriator, T. H. Parker, Esq. The great tithes have been commuted for £200, and the small for £201; the impropriator has a glebe of 25 acres. The church contains several old monuments, and one to the lady of the late Earl St. Vincent. There is a place of worship for Wesleyans; and at Caverswall Castle is a private Roman Catholic chapel. A school, on the national plan, is attached to the church.

Transcribed from A Topographical Dictionary of England, by Samuel Lewis, 7th edition, published in 1848.

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