Caversham (St. Peter)

CAVERSHAM (St. Peter), a parish, in the union of Henley, hundred of Binfield, county of Oxford, 1 mile (N.) from Reading; containing 1642 inhabitants. This place, during the civil wars, was the scene of a sharp skirmish between the royalist and parliamentarian forces; and Charles I., who had fallen into the hands of his enemies, was, for a short time, kept in confinement here. The parish comprises 4490a. 1r. 5p., of which 3191 acres are arable, 702 meadow, 361 wood, and 200 common. The village is pleasantly situated on the northern bank of the Thames, the high grounds commanding a fine view of the town of Reading; and is within a short distance of the Great Western railway, which passes on the opposite bank of the river. The living is a perpetual curacy; net income, £116; patrons, the Dean and Canons of Christ-Church, Oxford; impropriator, Blackall Simonds, Esq. The church was part of the first endowment of Nutley Abbey, in Buckinghamshire, the society of which here founded a cell, in which was a chapel, where at the time of the Dissolution was preserved a spear-head, said to be that wherewith Our Saviour was pierced on the cross. There is a chalybeate spring at Caversham Hill; and in the grounds of Shatesgrove House, another of similar quality. Caversham gives the inferior title of Viscount to Earl Cadogan.

Transcribed from A Topographical Dictionary of England, by Samuel Lewis, 7th edition, published in 1848.

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