Cave, South (All Saints)

CAVE, SOUTH (All Saints), a parish, in the unions of Howden and Beverley, Hunsley-Beacon division of the wapentake of Harthill, E. riding of York; containing 1852 inhabitants, of whom 1288 are in the market-town of South Cave, 27 miles (S. E.) from York, and 183 (N. by W.) from London. This parish comprises 7103a. 2r. 30p., and includes the townships of Broomfleet and Faxfleet; it is situated at the western extremity of the Wolds, and on the river Humber, which forms its boundary for three miles. The township of South Cave comprises 4323a. 1r. 20p. The surrounding country is very pleasing; the eminences affording many delightful views of Lincolnshire, and of the river, with the scenery on its banks. At the market, which is held on Monday, considerable quantities of corn are sold for the supply of the manufacturing towns in the West riding; it is shipped on the Humber, and the return cargoes consist of coal, freestone, lime, flags, and a variety of other necessary commodities. There is a fair on Trinity-Monday. The petty-sessions for the wapentake of Howdenshire take place here; and a manorial court is held in October, at which a constable is appointed. The town consists principally of three long streets, of which the longest is on the northern acclivity of a valley: having been anciently washed by the tides of the Humber, it obtained the name of Cove, afterwards corrupted to Cave. In the vicinity is Cave Castle, the seat of H. G. Barnard, Esq., a splendid embattled structure, with numerous turrets; the interior exhibits a corresponding style of magnificence, and is enriched with a noble collection of paintings by the first artists, including a fine portrait of Washington, whose ancestors possessed a portion of the estate, and resided here prior to their emigration to Virginia, in the middle of the seventeenth century. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at £8; net income, £168; patron and impropriator, Mr. Barnard: the great tithes have been commuted for £465, and the vicarial for £95. The church is a neat edifice, erected in 1601, and consists of a nave, north aisle, south transept, and chancel, with a fine tower. There are three places of worship belonging to Methodists, and a Roman Catholic chapel at Cave Castle.

Transcribed from A Topographical Dictionary of England, by Samuel Lewis, 7th edition, published in 1848.

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