Catterick (St. Anne)

CATTERICK (St. Anne), a parish, in the unions of Bedale, Richmond, and Northallerton; comprising, in the wapentake of Gilling-East, the townships of Bolton-upon-Swale, Ellerton-upon-Swale, Kiplin, Scorton, Uckerby, and Whitwell; in the wapentake of Hang-East, those of East and West Appleton, Brough, Catterick, Colbourne, Hipswell, Killerby, Scotton, and Tunstall; and in that of Hang-West, the township of Hudswell; N. riding of York; the whole containing 2965 inhabitants, of whom 600 are in the township of Catterick, 5 miles (S. E.) from Richmond. This is a place of great antiquity, having been the site of the Roman city called Cataractonium, where the Erminstreet branches off in two directions, and in the vicinity of which numerous Roman relics have been dug up at different periods. It also flourished during the Saxon times; but in the devastations of the Danes was utterly destroyed, and is at present of little importance. A large brazen caldron full of Roman coins was discovered about a century ago; and not many years since, a splendid armilla of gold was found in a field near the village: the former is preserved at Brough Hall, and the latter is in the possession of Lady Tyrconnel.

The parish comprises about 21,680 acres, of which 1561a. 6p. are in the township of Catterick: of these latter, 917 acres are arable, 586 meadow and pasture, and the rest wood, roads, &c. At the distance of a mile to the north is Catterick bridge over the river Swale, on which was formerly a chapel; and opposite is a racecourse. The Richmond branch of the York and Newcastle railway has a station at the bridge. The living is a vicarage, valued in the king's books at £25. 2. 1., and has a net income of £678; it is in the patronage of the Crown, and the impropriation belongs to divers persons. The small tithes for the townships of Hipswell and Hudswell were commuted for land in 1807. The church is partly in the early style of English architecture, but chiefly of a later date, and consists of a nave, chancel, aisles, and tower: the contract for its erection, dated 1412, has been published by the Rev. J. Raine. In addition to the church, are three chapels in the parish, in the patronage of the Vicar. A school, and an hospital for six poor widows, were founded in 1658, by Michael Syddall, vicar, and have an endowment now amounting to about £80 per annum. Nelson died in the arms of the Rev. Dr. Scott, vicar of the parish, who was his lordship's chaplain at the battle of Trafalgar, in the year 1805.

Transcribed from A Topographical Dictionary of England, by Samuel Lewis, 7th edition, published in 1848.

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