Cassington (St. Peter)

CASSINGTON (St. Peter), a parish, in the union of Woodstock, hundred of Wootton, county of Oxford, 6¾ miles (N. W.) from Oxford; containing, with the hamlet of Worton, 381 inhabitants. The manor formerly belonged to the Montacutes, one of whom, in the reign of Henry II., obtained leave to convert the mansion into a castle, of which some remains existed till within the last 50 years, when the materials were used in building the parsonage-house. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at £12; patrons and appropriators, the Dean and Canons of Christ-Church, Oxford. The tithes have been commuted for £210, and the glebe consists of 55 acres. The church, which is in the Norman style, was originally built in the reign of Henry II., by Geoffrey Clinton, chamberlain to that monarch: the arch supporting the tower, and the groined roof of the chancel, of Norman character, are remains of the ancient building.

Transcribed from A Topographical Dictionary of England, by Samuel Lewis, 7th edition, published in 1848.

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