Cannington (St. Mary)

CANNINGTON (St. Mary), a parish, in the union of Bridgwater, hundred of Cannington, W. division of Somerset, 3½ miles (N. W. by W.) from Bridgwater; containing 1349 inhabitants. This place is of considerable antiquity, having given name to the hundred, and was formerly of much greater importance than it is at present. Camden derives its name from its having been occupied by a tribe of Britons, called the Cangi. The navigable river Parret flows on the north and east sides of the parish. The living is a vicarage, valued in the king's books at £7. 10. 10.; net income, £371; patron and impropriator, Lord Clifford, whose tithes have been commuted for £965. There is a Roman Catholic chapel at Court House. A national school, erected at an expense of £290, has an endowment of £19. 12. per annum. Mr. Rogers bequeathed £300 per annum, directing that £6 each should be annually given to twenty poor men, and the remainder to the poor generally. A Benedictine nunnery was founded in the reign of Stephen, by Robert de Courcy, and dedicated to the Blessed Virgin; it consisted of a prioress and six or seven nuns, whose revenue was estimated at £39. 15. 8. The buildings are now occupied by a society of nuns, who support a school.

Transcribed from A Topographical Dictionary of England, by Samuel Lewis, 7th edition, published in 1848.

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