Cameley (St. James)

CAMELEY (St. James), a parish, in the union of Clutton, hundred of Chewton, E. division of Somerset, 12 miles (S. by E.) from Bristol; containing 643 inhabitants. It is thought to have been the site of a Roman station, where, in the time of Ostorius, was a temple in honour of Claudius Cæsar, from which circumstance, Temple-Cloud, a tything in the parish, derived its name, supposed to be a corruption of Templum Claudii; and this opinion is in some degree confirmed by the frequent discovery of relics of Roman antiquity. The parish is on the road from Bristol to Wells, and comprises by measurement 1633 acres, mostly fertile land in profitable cultivation: stone of a peculiarly good quality for flagging, and of which considerable quantities are sent to Bath, is extensively quarried. In Temple-Cloud are a respectable inn and a post-office: a considerable business is carried on by a firm as cheesefactors and wool-staplers; and many of the inhabitants of the parish, of whom the greater number reside in this part, are employed in collieries in the neighbourhood. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £6. 18. 4., and in the patronage of the family of Hippesley: the tithes have been commuted for £218. 12., and the glebe comprises 96 acres. The church has been enlarged by the erection of a gallery.

Transcribed from A Topographical Dictionary of England, by Samuel Lewis, 7th edition, published in 1848.

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