Camden-Town

CAMDEN-TOWN, a chapelry, in the parish of St. Pancras, Holborn division of the hundred of Ossulstone, county of Middlesex, 3¼ miles (N. W.) from St. Paul's; containing 14,987 inhabitants. This place takes its name from the Marquess Camden, lessee of the prebendal manor of Cantelows, in which it is situated. The principal part has been erected within the last few years; the houses are in general well built and regular, and the crescent, terrace, and other ranges in the upper part of it, are of handsome appearance, and command a partial, but pleasing, view of the Hampstead and Highgate hills. Among the most recent improvements, those in the direction of the road to Holloway, along the sides of which many elegant residences are still in progress of erection, are particularly deserving of notice, and, together with the formation of buildings in other parts of the neighbourhood, have contributed greatly to increase the importance and enlarge the limits of this appendage to the western part of the metropolis. The streets, which are wide and regularly formed, are lighted and partially paved; and the inhabitants are supplied with water from a conduit, into which it is conveyed from Hampstead. The Camden-Town station of the Birmingham railway forms one of the most extraordinary assemblages of buildings in the country. Besides twelve acres at Euston-square, thirty acres are occupied here by the company, who have lately made most extensive alterations in their works, and just completed new buildings of remarkable size, at this station. The Regent's canal passes through the northern part of the district. A veterinary college, in which lectures are delivered on the anatomy and diseases of the horse, was established in 1791, and subsequently confirmed by royal charter; the premises, which are neatly built of brick, include a spacious area, and comprise a school for the instruction of pupils, a theatre for dissections and the delivery of lectures, a museum for anatomical preparations, and an infirmary, in which is stabling for 60 horses, with paddocks adjoining.

The chapel, erected in 1828, on ground given by the Marquess Camden, is a neat edifice of brick, with a handsome stone portico of the Ionic order at the west end, above which rises a circular turret with a cupola. The living is a perpetual curacy, in the gift of the Vicar; income, £200. A temporary church was opened in 1845; and a second, at Agar Town, in April 1847. Near the chapel are a chapel and cemetery belonging to the parish of St. Martin in the Fields, in connexion with which parish, also, are nine almshouses in Bayham-street. The Independents and Wesleyans have each a place of worship. On the eastern side of Haverstock-hill is a range of neat and commodious almshouses, in the Elizabethan style, erected for decayed journeymen tailors by the master tailors of the metropolis; the ground was given by Mr. Stultz, who also built a chapel, which was consecrated in June 1843, and to which there is a chaplain, who has apartments on the spot. At Haverstock-hill are also the buildings of the Orphan Working School, which was removed hither from the City-road in 1847.

Transcribed from A Topographical Dictionary of England, by Samuel Lewis, 7th edition, published in 1848.

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