Barrow-Upon-Humber (Holy Trinity)

BARROW-UPON-HUMBER (Holy Trinity), a parish, in the union of Glandford-Brigg, N. division of the wapentake of Yarborough, parts of Lindsey, county of Lincoln, 2¼ miles (E.) from Barton-upon-Humber; containing 1662 inhabitants. Henry VIII. landed at this place on his route to Thornton Abbey. The parish is situated on the river Humber, and on the road from London through Peterborough and Lincoln to Hull; it comprises 4720 acres, of which 3000 are arable, and the remainder meadow and pasture, with one or two small plantations. The soil of the arable land is a strong rich loam, and there is also some fine turnip land; in that part of the parish near the Humber, the soil is a kind of clay warp, apparently embanked from the river at some early period. The village, which is large and well built, comprises a spacious street, at the south end of which is an area called the market-place, with an ancient cross; the view of Hull and neighbouring parts of Yorkshire is very fine. A manufactory of glue is carried on, affording employment to about 20 persons. A market for cattle, held once a fortnight, was commenced in 1832, but afterwards discontinued; and in the same year was established a ferry for passengers and cattle, from a place called New Holland, in this parish, to Hull, a distance of 2¾ miles. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at £9. 16.; net income, £348: the patronage and impropriation belong to the Crown. The tithes were commuted for corn-rents and a money payment in 1797. The church is an ancient Norman structure, with a handsome tower of later English architecture, and exhibits appearances of having been repaired at different times and in various styles. There are places of worship for Wesleyans, Primitive Methodists, and Independents. About a mile north-westward from the village is an intrenchment called the Castle, supposed to have been a British camp; and near it are several barrows. A monastery was founded about the middle of the seventh century, by Wulphere, King of Mercia; and in digging on the site, a little north of the village, some years since, a coffin, a valuable gold ring, and other remains were found. Harrison, the inventor of the chronometer for discovering the longitude at sea, and who, in 1763, received a premium of £20,000 from the Board of Longitude, was a native of the place.

Transcribed from A Topographical Dictionary of England, by Samuel Lewis, 7th edition, published in 1848.

Navigation

Preface
A
B
C
D
E
F
G
H
I
J
K
L
M
N
O
P
Q
R
S
T
U
V
W
X
Y
Z