Barmby-on-the-Marsh

BARMBY-on-the-Marsh, a chapelry, in the parish and union of Howden, wapentake of Howdenshire, E. riding of York, 3½ miles (W.) from Howden; containing 506 inhabitants. This place, called in Domesday book Barnebi, was, according to tradition, parted by William the Conqueror among forty of his soldiers; and in conveyances of property it is described as being in forty parts, or oxgangs, bearing the names of the original owners. The township comprises 1459 acres, of which 49 are common or waste. The village is pleasantly situated at the confluence of the Ouse and Derwent, and contains two sail-cloth and coarse linen manufactories. Races are held on the last Thursday in June. The living is a perpetual curacy; net income, £30; patron, the Vicar of Howden. The chapel, dedicated to St. Helen, was the tithe-barn of the prebendary of Barmby till the dissolution of monasteries. There are places of worship for Primitive and Wesleyan Methodists. In the reign of James I. Richard Galthorpe gave to trustees certain lands, now producing £100 per annum, to be applied to the use of the poor, the reading minister, and the repairs of the chapel, staiths, jetties, &c.; and John Blanchard endowed a lectureship, the appointment to which is vested in the inhabitants. Here are two mineral springs called St. Peter's and St. Helen's wells, one chalybeate, the other sulphureous.

Transcribed from A Topographical Dictionary of England, by Samuel Lewis, 7th edition, published in 1848.

Navigation

Preface
A
B
C
D
E
F
G
H
I
J
K
L
M
N
O
P
Q
R
S
T
U
V
W
X
Y
Z