Balsall

BALSALL, a chapelry, in the parish of Hamptonin-Arden, union of Solihull, Solihull division of the hundred of Hemlingford, N. division of the county of Warwick, 4½ miles (S. E. by E.) from Solihull; containing 1160 inhabitants. It comprises 4824 acres; and is partly bounded on the west by the river Blythe, and skirted on the east by the road between Kenilworth and Coleshill. The chapel, dedicated to St. Mary, was originally the church of a preceptory founded here by the Knights Templars, to whom Roger de Mowbray had given the lordship: it was repaired in 1823, at a cost of £979. The living is a perpetual curacy; patrons, the Governors of Balsall Hospital, in whom the impropriation is also vested. Lady Katherine Leveson, in 1670, devised the manor for the erection and endowment of an hospital for twenty women. The hospital was incorporated in the first year of the reign of Queen Anne, and eleven trustees were appointed, with power to enlarge the buildings and increase the number of inmates, which now amounts to thirty; exclusively of whom, the establishment comprises a master, under-master, apothecary, matron, and nurse. The annual receipts are about £1500, of which the master, in addition to his stipend, receives £50 as perpetual curate of Balsall; a sum of £50 is also paid to the vicar of Long Itchington.

Transcribed from A Topographical Dictionary of England, by Samuel Lewis, 7th edition, published in 1848.

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