Bainton (St. Andrew)

BAINTON (St. Andrew), a parish, in the union of Driffield, Bainton-Beacon division of the wapentake of Harthill, E. riding of York, 5¾ miles (S. W.) from Great Driffield; containing 452 inhabitants. This place, in which a beacon was anciently erected on an eminence near the village, to warn of approaching danger, gives the name to this division of the wapentake. The parish comprises 3280 acres, which include Neswick, and of which two-thirds are arable, and the remainder meadow and pasture with a small portion of woodland. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £35. 14. 9½.; net income, £757; patrons, the President and Fellows of St. John's College, Oxford. The land attached comprises about 602 acres, the tithes of Bainton having been commuted for land in 1774. The church is an ancient structure, the tower of which exhibits a part only of its octagonal spire, the other part having fallen down about the middle of the last century: the interior, which was repaired in 1842, contains several interesting antiquities. There are places of worship for Primitive Methodists and Wesleyans. The petty-sessions for the Bainton-Beacon division are held here once a month.

Transcribed from A Topographical Dictionary of England, by Samuel Lewis, 7th edition, published in 1848.

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