Bainbridge

BAINBRIDGE, a township, in the parish of Aysgarth, wapentake of Hang-West, N. riding of York, 1½ mile (S. W.) from Askrigg; containing 786 inhabitants. This township comprises by computation 14,210 acres, and takes its name from its situation on the river Bain, which is here crossed by a good stone bridge on the Aysgarth road, and is a considerable stream tributary to the neighbouring Ure, over which is also a bridge on the Askrigg road, about half a mile from the former. The Bain is supplied from the lake Seamer-Water, which is of considerable extent and has its source among the mountains of Raydale-side, a secluded valley within the township; the lake has two beautiful cataracts on its north-western side, and is a favourite resort of several kinds of waterfowl. Overlooking the mouth of the lake stands the beautiful rural hamlet of Counter-side, opposite the Roman station on Addlebrough mountain. The station, with the camp beneath, commanded an important and extensive district, now comprised, with its various ramifications, under the name of Wensley dale, and varying from the wildest mountain to the richest vale scenery in England, though but imperfectly known to tourists. Near the camp have been found divers Roman relics, including a statue of the Emperor Commodus. At Stalling-Busk, in Raydale-side, is a church, the living of which is in the gift of the Vicar of Aysgarth: at Bainbridge the Wesleyans and Society of Friends have places of worship; and the Friends have also a meeting-house at Counterside. The celebrated Dr. John Fothergill was born at Carr-End, in the district.

Transcribed from A Topographical Dictionary of England, by Samuel Lewis, 7th edition, published in 1848.

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