Butterworth

BUTTERWORTH, a township, in the parish and union of Rochdale, hundred of Salford, S. division of the county of Lancaster, 2 miles (E. by S.) from Rochdale; containing 5088 inhabitants. The first lord of Butterworth upon record is Reginald de Bot'worth, who built the original mansion, called Butterworth Hall, in the reign of Stephen or Henry II. In Edward I.'s reign, Sir Baldwin Teutonicus or de Tyas, a knight of St. John of Jerusalem, and private secretary to John of Gaunt, granted all his lands in the township to Sir Robert de Holland in free marriage with his daughter Joan, who, surviving her husband, married, secondly, Sir John de Byron. The Ellands, however, as lords of Rochdale, claimed a superiority in the manor; but by an inquisition taken in the reign of Charles II., it was found that there was no manor at all. The Butterworth family resided here for several centuries. The township comprises 3752 acres, mostly pasture and moorland; 1752 are in the Freehold Side, and 2000 in the Lordship Side. Coal-mines and stone-quarries are in operation; the former are numerous, and, with bleach and calico works, afford extensive employment to the population. The Leeds and Liverpool canal, and the Manchester and Leeds railway, pass through the township.— See Milnrow.

Transcribed from A Topographical Dictionary of England, by Samuel Lewis, 7th edition, published in 1848.

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