Bushbury, or Byshbury (St. Mary)

BUSHBURY, or Byshbury (St. Mary), a parish, in the union of Penkridge, partly in the E. division of the hundred of Cuttlestone, and partly in the N. division of that of Seisdon, S. division of the county of Stafford, 3 miles (N. by E.) from Wolverhampton; containing, with the township of Essington, and the hamlet of Moseley, 1509 inhabitants. This parish comprises 6400 acres, mostly arable land, well wooded. The surface is undulated, and partly elevated; and from Bushbury hill, 650 feet above the level of the sea, are most extensive and beautiful views, embracing the Cley hills on the south-west, the Wrekin on the west, and Stafford, &c., on the north. The population is almost entirely agricultural. The Staffordshire and Worcestershire canal, and the Grand Junction railway, pass through the parish. The village is sheltered on the east by the hill, which is covered with a profusion of yew and other trees; and in the vicinity are some handsome mansions. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at £7. 11. 5½., and in the patronage of the Landowners; net income, £159. The church, which has a square tower, belonged to the priory of St. Thomas, near Stafford; it was built about 1460, and was repaired and enlarged in 1834, when 250 sittings were gained. A school is supported by subscription. Near the village appears a considerable tumulus.

Transcribed from A Topographical Dictionary of England, by Samuel Lewis, 7th edition, published in 1848.

Navigation

Preface
A
B
C
D
E
F
G
H
I
J
K
L
M
N
O
P
Q
R
S
T
U
V
W
X
Y
Z