Burwardsley

BURWARDSLEY, a chapelry, in the parish of Bunbury, union of Nantwich, Higher division of the hundred of Broxton, S. division of the county of Chester, 2 miles (S. E. by S.) from Tattenhall; containing 458 inhabitants. The manor was given by the abbot of St. Werburgh's at Chester to Roger de Combre or Fitz-Alured, on condition that he should champion for the monastery; and his daughter and coheir brought the whole or part of the estate to the Touchet family. Robert, Lord Cholmondeley, is described as lord in 1662. Of late years the manor has been esteemed as subordinate to that of Tattenhall, which belonged also to the Touchets. Burwardsley was sold in 1804 by John Crewe, Esq., afterwards Lord Crewe, to Thomas Tarlton, Esq., of Bolesworth Castle. The chapelry comprises 998a. 3r. 14p.; the surface is finely undulated, the soil clay and a light loam, and the views very extensive. There are numerous quarries of white and red sandstone, the material of one of which is of excellent quality for buildings. Many of the inhabitants are employed in the manufacture of shoes. The Tattenhall station of the Chester and Crewe railway is distant about three miles only. The living is a perpetual curacy; net income, £46. 12.: patrons, sixteen Trustees; impropriator, Samuel Aldersey, Esq., but who will be eventually succeeded by the Haberdashers' Company. A rent-charge of £100 has been awarded as a commutation for the tithes. There is neither glebe nor glebe-house in the chapelry; but at Tattenhall is a plot of about fifteen acres. The chapel, dedicated to St. John, and beautifully situated, is a small stone building, erected by subscription in 1735. The Primitive Methodists have a place of worship.

Transcribed from A Topographical Dictionary of England, by Samuel Lewis, 7th edition, published in 1848.

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