Burnsall (St. Wilfrid)

BURNSALL (St. Wilfrid), a parish, in the union of Skipton, E. division of the wapentake of Staincliffe and Ewcross, W. riding of York, 9½ miles (N. N. E.) from Skipton; containing 2726 inhabitants, of whom 284 are in the township of Burnsall with Thorpe-sub-Montem. The parish comprises the townships of Appletree-wick, Burnsall with Thorpe-sub-Montem, Cracoe, Hartlington, and Hetton with Boardley; and the chapelries of Rilston, and Coniston with Kilnsay; the whole forming an area, by computation, of 25,950 acres, of which 2680 are in the manors of Burnsall and Thorpe. The soil, in the valley, is rich, but on the high grounds poor turbary earth, with heath; the surface is varied, and the scenery mountainous and romantic. There are three factories, two for cotton and one for wool, employing about 120 hands. The village of Burnsall is situated on the river Wharfe, over which is a bridge of three arches, built in 1827; and the village of Thorpe in a deep glen beneath the mountains of Thorpe Fell and Burnsall Fell. The parish, it is probable, anciently formed part of that of Linton, to the rector of which it still pays a modus in lieu of corn-tithes. The living is a rectory in two medieties, valued together in the king's books at £36; net income of the first, £315; patron, the Rev. J. Graham; and of the second, £276; patron, the Earl of Craven. The church is an ancient structure, partly Norman, and partly in the English style, with a square embattled tower: on each side of the entrance of the choir are a pulpit and reading-desk. The grammar school was founded on the 26th of May, 1602, by Sir William Craven, Knt., who endowed it with a rentcharge of £20, to which, on 16th of June, 1624, Elizabeth Craven added a bequest of £200. Sir William improved the church, in 1612; built four bridges, for the repair of which and the highways he left a rent-charge of £8; and was a great benefactor to the parish, of which he was a native and resident. Various beautiful pieces of quartz and other variegated fossils, and spar, are dug from Greenhow hill, which has been a rich lead-mining district.

Transcribed from A Topographical Dictionary of England, by Samuel Lewis, 7th edition, published in 1848.

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