Burnham-Market, or Burnham-Westgate (St. Mary)

BURNHAM-MARKET, or Burnham-Westgate (St. Mary), a parish, in the union of Docking, hundred of Brothercross, W. division of Norfolk, 36½ miles (N. W.) from Norwich, and 120 (N. N. E.) from London; containing 1126 inhabitants. This parish derives its name from the small river Burn, on which it is situated, and takes the adjunct Westgate to distinguish it from adjoining parishes of the name of Burnham. It is pleasantly situated in a fertile valley, environed by a range of hills on the west and south, within 3 miles of the sea; and comprises 3047a. 2r. 1p., of which about 2533 acres are arable, 184 pasture and meadow, 169 woodland, and 68 waste. The town or village, the lower part of which is in the parishes of Burnham Sutton and Ulph, has experienced considerable improvement of late years, though its market has been discontinued, and the buildings appropriated to that purpose converted into dwellings; the houses are in general well built, and the inhabitants amply supplied with water. A small manufactory for iron and brass has been established, and hempen cloth is prepared to a limited extent. Fairs for toys are held on Easter Tuesday and Wednesday, and August 1st and 2nd. The county magistrates hold petty-sessions here on the last Saturday in the month; and courts baron are occasionally held. The living is a rectory, with a mediety of the consolidated rectory or rectories of Burnham Norton and Ulph united, valued jointly in the king's books at £20. 16. 8., and in the patronage of Christ-Church College, Cambridge. The tithes of the parish have been commuted for £361 payable to the rector, and £361 to the college; the glebe comprises 84 acres, and there is a rent-charge of £38. 5. payable to the rector of Burnham-Sutton. The church is a neat structure of stone and flint, chiefly in the early style, consisting of a nave, chancel, and aisles, with a square embattled tower ornamented with sculptured figures: in the north aisle is a whole-length figure of a priest, rudely sculptured in stone. The site of another parochial church, dedicated to St. Edmund, is now occupied by a shop. All Saints' church, Burnham-Ulph, is used as a chapel to the church of Burnham-Westgate. There is a place of worship for Independents.

Transcribed from A Topographical Dictionary of England, by Samuel Lewis, 7th edition, published in 1848.

Navigation

Preface
A
B
C
D
E
F
G
H
I
J
K
L
M
N
O
P
Q
R
S
T
U
V
W
X
Y
Z