Bulford (St. John)

BULFORD (St. John), a parish, in the union and hundred of Amesbury, Salisbury and Amesbury, and S. divisions of Wilts, 2 miles (N. E. by N.) from Amesbury; containing 367 inhabitants. This place, called in the Domesday survey Boltinstone, and in other ancient documents Bolteford, was the property of the nunnery of Amesbury. The parish is situated to the east of the river Avon, which is here crossed by a handsome iron bridge; and a branch of the road connects the village with Amesbury; the number of acres is estimated at 3638. The Avon affords excellent trout-fishing, and the downs fine coursing. There is a mill for the manufacture of the coarser kinds of paper. The living is a donative, with a net income of £75, and in the patronage of Anthony Southby, Esq., M.D., who is impropriator: the tithes have been commuted for £97. The church is a plain edifice of stone and flints. Near the village are two upright stones, similar to those of Stonehenge, of which one is in the middle of the Avon, and the other on the open downs to the south-east; and about a mile higher up the valley is a third of similar description. There are also numerous barrows.

Transcribed from A Topographical Dictionary of England, by Samuel Lewis, 7th edition, published in 1848.

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