Budworth, Great (St. Mary and All Saints)

BUDWORTH, GREAT (St. Mary and All Saints), a parish, in the unions of Runcorn, Altrincham, and Northwich, county of Chester; containing 17,103 inhabitants, of whom 677 are in the township of Great Budworth, 3 miles (N. by E.) from Northwich. The manor was possessed, in the beginning of Henry III.'s reign, by Geoffrey de Dutton, who from his residence at this place was sometimes called de Budworth; Peter, his grandson, removed to Warburton, assumed that name, and was the immediate ancestor of the Warburton family, in whom the property became vested. Geoffrey gave a third part of Budworth to the prior and convent of Norton, whose estate here, after the Dissolution, was granted by Henry VIII. to the Grimsditchs; it was afterwards divided and sold in severalties. This is the largest parish in Cheshire, next to Prestbury, being fifteen miles in length and ten in breadth, and comprising 26,676 acres, whereof 789 are in Budworth township. It contains the townships of Anderton, Antrobus, Appleton, Aston by Budworth, Barnton, Bartington, Budworth, Cogshall, Comberbach, Crowley, Dutton, Little Leigh, Marbury, Marston, Peover-Inferior, Pickmere, Plumbley, Seven-Oaks, Stretton, Tabley-Inferior, Whitley Inferior and Superior, and Wincham, in the hundred of Bucklow; the chapelry of Hartford, and the townships of Castle-Northwich and Winnington, in the hundred of Eddisbury; and the townships of Allostock, Birches, Hulse, Lack-Dennis, Lostock-Gralam, Northwich, and Nether Peover, part of Rudheath lordship, and the parochial chapelry of Witton, in the hundred of Northwich. The village of Budworth is pleasantly situated on a gentle acclivity, near two sheets of water called Budworth-mere, or Marbury, and Pickmere; and in the vicinity are several handsome seats, among which are Tabley House, that of Lord de Tabley, Belmont House, and Marbury Hall. The principal landed proprietors are his lordship, and the Warburton and Leigh families. The population is employed to a considerable extent in the manufacture of salt, which prevails throughout the entire neighbourhood. The river Weaver and the Duke of Bridgewater's canal pass through the parish. Two fairs are annually held.

The living is a vicarage, valued in the king's books at £6. 10.; net income, £171; patrons and appropriators, the Dean and Canons of Christ-Church, Oxford. The church consists of a nave, chancel, aisles, and transepts, with a fine tower containing eight bells; the tower appears to have been built or restored about 1520: there are several monuments to the Leycester and Warburton families. The edifice sustained considerable damage from the parliamentarian troops in 1647. There are churches or chapels, forming separate incumbencies, at Appleton, Barnton, Hartford, Little Leigh, Lostock, Nether Peover, Northwich, Stockton, Stretton, Tabley, Whitley, Wilderspool, and Witton. In the north-eastern angle of the churchyard is a school, supposed to have been built by the Rev. John Dean, about 1600; it is endowed with the interest of £200, given by Mr. Pickering and Mrs. Glover.

Transcribed from A Topographical Dictionary of England, by Samuel Lewis, 7th edition, published in 1848.

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