Budeaux, or Budock, St.

BUDEAUX, or BUDOCK, ST., a parish, in the union of Plympton St. Mary, hundred of Roborough, Roborough and S. divisions of Devon, 4½ miles (N. W. by N.) from Plymouth; containing 790 inhabitants. This place, which is beautifully situated on an eminence rising from the river Tamar, from which it is distant about three-quarters of a mile, was, during the parliamentary war, the scene of a conflict between the royalists under Sir Richard Grenville, and the forces of the garrison of Plymouth, then in the possession of the parliamentarians. The royalists, who had strongly fortified the church of St. Budock, as their chief station while besieging the garrison, were driven into it by a sally of the besieged, under Colonel Martin, the governor; and Major Stuckley, with several officers and about 100 men were made prisoners. The parish comprises by computation 2500 acres, of which 120 are in the county of Cornwall: there are some quarries of slate, and of stone of inferior quality. The river is navigable for vessels of small burthen from Saltash-ferry, about a mile distant, to the Weirhead, at certain times of the tide. A fair is held on the 29th of May. The living is a perpetual curacy, in the patronage of the Vicar of St. Andrew's, Plymouth: the tithes have been commuted for £350; the income of the curacy is about £113. The church, which was rebuilt in 1563, is a neat structure in the later English style. There are places of worship for Wesleyans; and a school has an endowment of about £86 per annum, arising from land.

Transcribed from A Topographical Dictionary of England, by Samuel Lewis, 7th edition, published in 1848.

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