Buckland-Denham (St. Mary)

BUCKLAND-DENHAM (St. Mary), a parish, and formerly a market-town, in the union of Frome, hundred of Kilmersdon, E. division of Somerset, 2½ miles (N. W. by N.) from Frome; containing 516 inhabitants. This was once a place of greater importance, having been distinguished for the manufacture of woollen-cloth. The parish comprises by computation 1400 acres; the soil is generally light and sandy, the surface hilly, and the lower lands are watered by a small branch of the river Frome. There are quarries of blue lias, which is raised for burning into lime. A market to be held on Tuesday, and a fair on the eve, day, and morrow of St. Michael, were granted in the 24th of Henry III., to Geoffrey Dinant, lord of the manor; and the assizes were frequently held in a town-hall here. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at £6. 9. 7., and in the patronage of the Bishop of Bath and Wells. The impropriate tithes, formerly belonging to the prebendary of Buckland-Denham in the Cathedral of Wells, but now to the Ecclesiastical Commissioners, that prebend having been suppressed, have been commuted for £162. 10., and the vicarial tithes for £147; there are 68 acres of impropriate glebe, and nearly 9 of vicarial. The church, anciently connected with an Augustine nunnery founded in 1120, has some details of Norman and early English architecture; of the former, is a very fine arch. There is a place of worship for Wesleyans. A Roman pavement was discovered at Whitby in 1838.

Transcribed from A Topographical Dictionary of England, by Samuel Lewis, 7th edition, published in 1848.

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