Buckenham, Old (All Saints)

BUCKENHAM, OLD (All Saints), a parish, in the union of Guiltcross, hundred of Shropham, W. division of Norfolk, 3 miles (S. S. E.) from Attleburgh; containing 1255 inhabitants. This was anciently a place of considerable importance, and is supposed to derive its name either from Boccen, a beech-tree, and Ham, a dwelling-place; or from an allusion to the bucks, or deer, that thronged the adjacent forests. It was given by the Conqueror to William D'Albini, whose son of the same name married the widow of Henry I., became Earl of Chichester, and founded a priory for Augustine canons, in honour of St. James the Apostle, about the middle of the twelfth century. At the Dissolution, the establishment consisted of a prior and eight canons, whose revenue was estimated at £131. 11. Here were three guilds, dedicated respectively to St. Margaret, St. Peter, and St. Thomas the Martyr. The parish comprises 4820a. 1r. 7p., of which 3703 acres are arable, 1050 pasture, 49 wood, and 18 water: the common was inclosed in 1790. The living is a perpetual curacy, in the patronage of the Inhabitants, with a net income of £102: the tithes have been commuted for £1527. 18. The church has a thatched roof, and an octagonal tower with five bells. There are places of worship for Baptists, Sandemanians, and Primitive Methodists.

Transcribed from A Topographical Dictionary of England, by Samuel Lewis, 7th edition, published in 1848.

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