Bruisyard (St. Peter)

BRUISYARD (St. Peter), a parish, in the union and hundred of Plomesgate, E. division of Suffolk, 4½ miles (N. W.) from Saxmundham; containing 296 inhabitants. It comprises by admeasurement 1126 acres: the soil is a fertile clay, the surface is undulated, and the lower grounds are watered by a small river. The living is a perpetual curacy; net income, £62; patron and impropriator, the Earl of Stradbroke, whose tithes have been commuted for £92. The church is an ancient structure, chiefly in the later English style, with a circular tower at the west end, and consists of a nave and chancel, with a chapel on the south side, in which is a slab, bearing the effigies, in brass, of Michael Hare and his lady. A collegiate chapel, in honour of the Annunciation, was founded at Campsey, for a warden and four Secular priests, by Maud, Countess of Ulster, in 1347, seven years after which the establishment was removed to Bruisyard: the site and possessions, in 1366, were surrendered to an abbess and nuns of the order of St. Clare, who continued here until the general suppression, when their annual revenue was estimated at £56. 2. 1. It was granted by Henry VIII. to Sir Nicholas Hare, and came by marriage to the family of Rous.

Transcribed from A Topographical Dictionary of England, by Samuel Lewis, 7th edition, published in 1848.

Navigation

Preface
A
B
C
D
E
F
G
H
I
J
K
L
M
N
O
P
Q
R
S
T
U
V
W
X
Y
Z