Broomfield (St. Mary)

BROOMFIELD (St. Mary), a parish, in the union and hundred of Chelmsford, S. division of Essex, 2½ miles (N.) from Chelmsford; containing 820 inhabitants. This parish is supposed to have derived its name from the profusion of broom growing in the immediate vicinity. It is on the road to Braintree, and comprises by computation 2000 acres of fertile land, of which about four-fifths are arable, and the remainder, with the exception of a few acres of wood, meadow and pasture. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at £7. 13. 4.; net income, £161; patron, the Bishop of London; impropriator, H. Finch, Esq. The church, a very ancient edifice with a circular tower, has many interesting details in the Norman style: the vicarage-house is a handsome residence. The learned Patrick Young died at the vicarage-house, in 1652; he was keeper of the king's library, and superintended the printing of the Septuagint from the Alexandrian MSS. The Rev. Thomas Cox, who translated from the French Dupin's Life of Christ, and also his Ecclesiastical History, and compiled part of a History of England, and of the Magna Britannia, was vicar of the parish.

Transcribed from A Topographical Dictionary of England, by Samuel Lewis, 7th edition, published in 1848.

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