Brislington (St. Luke)

BRISLINGTON (St. Luke), a parish, in the union and hundred of Keynsham, E. division of Somerset, 3 miles (S. E. by E.) from Bristol; containing 1338 inhabitants. The parish is situated on the road between Bath and Bristol, and contains 2090 acres; it is bounded on the north-east by the river Avon, and intersected by the Great Western railway. Coal was formerly wrought; iron is found, and stone quarried for building. The living is a perpetual curacy; net income, £159; patron, E. W. L. Popham, Esq.; impropriators, the family of Langton. The church was enlarged in 1818 by 265 sittings: in the churchyard is a handsome cross. There is a place of worship for Independents. Brislington House, an asylum for lunatics, was erected by Edward Long Fox, M.D., who first introduced the classification of patients in such establishments, and was celebrated for the cure of mental diseases: the buildings comprise a spacious central edifice with detached wings, extending in front 495 feet; the estate is well planted, and consists of about 200 acres. A chapel, dedicated to St. Anne, was founded by one of the Lords de la Warre, in the northern part of the manor; but there are not any vestiges of it. A variety of Roman coins was found in an adjoining field. in 1829. Langton, who married the widow of Sir Thomas Cobb, of Langton Court, in the parish, and was the intimate friend of Addison, is said to have written many of the papers of the Spectator in a summer-house belonging to the mansion. The Rev. W. D. Conybeare, author of some well-known works on geology, was for some years curate and lecturer of the parish.

Transcribed from A Topographical Dictionary of England, by Samuel Lewis, 7th edition, published in 1848.

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