Brington (St. Mary)

BRINGTON (St. Mary), a parish, in the union of Brixworth, hundred of Newbottle-Grove, S. division of the county of Northampton, 7 miles (N. W.) by W.) from Northampton; containing, with the hamlets of Little Brington and Newbottle, 795 inhabitants. This place was the occasional resort of Charles I., who, during his detension at Holdenby, about two miles distant, came frequently to Althorp House, in the parish. Althorp, which was formerly more populous, now contains only the noble mansion of Earl Spencer, to whom it gives the title of Viscount. The house is a splendid pile of building, occupying three sides of a quadrangle, and contains numerous spacious apartments, decorated with a number of very valuable paintings; it has also a magnificent library. The park is beautifully undulating, and abounds in fine forest-timber. The parish formerly included part of the hamlet of Clasthorpe; but from the neglect of walking the boundaries, that portion, containing about 300 acres, was claimed by the parish of Flore, in which the remainder was situated. Brington now comprises by computation 3800 acres; it is near the London and North-Western railway and the Grand Junction canal.

The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £40, and in the gift of Earl Spencer: on the inclosure, about a century since, 380 acres of land, now valued at about £500 per annum, were allotted in lieu of tithes, and some further tithes have been commuted for a rentcharge of £62. 10.; there are about 9½ acres of old glebe. The church is in the early, decorated, and later English styles; the chapel contains some fine monuments to the memory of deceased members of the Spencer family, and in 1846 the present Earl added a bay, in memory of his father, mother, and eldest brother the late Earl: the windows of this bay are of the best modern painted glass. There is a place of worship for dissenters. A school is maintained by Earl Spencer; and a Sunday school is supported by an allowance of £12 per annum from certain charity estates, which were settled in the reign of Henry VI., and produce £225 per annum. There are a chalybeate and a petrifying spring. Henry Chicheley, Archbishop of Canterbury, and founder of All Souls' College, Oxford, and of the college of Higham-Ferrers, in this county, was for ten years rector of the parish.

Transcribed from A Topographical Dictionary of England, by Samuel Lewis, 7th edition, published in 1848.

Navigation

Preface
A
B
C
D
E
F
G
H
I
J
K
L
M
N
O
P
Q
R
S
T
U
V
W
X
Y
Z