Brindle (St. James)

BRINDLE (St. James), a parish, in the union of Chorley, hundred of Leyland, N. division of the county of Lancaster, 4¾ miles (N. by E.) from Chorley; containing 1401 inhabitants. This place appears to have been granted, by the superior tenant of the crown, soon after the Conquest, to a family who were designated from their possessions. The manor passed by the marriage of the heiress of "Sir Peter de Bryn, of Brynhill," to the Gerards, with whom it continued till the reign of Henry VIII., when Sir William Cavendish is found patron of the living, though the manor did not come into the possession of the Cavendish family until the middle of last century. The parish is elevated land, and comprises 2900 acres, of which the soil is clay and sand; about one-third is arable, and the rest pasture, garden-ground, and waste: the river Lostock passes at the south-western extremity, where it receives a nameless brook, whose slender stream flows near the village. There are two valuable stone-quarries in the parish; one at Duxon Hill, producing large millstones, which are frequently exported to Ireland; and the other at Denham Hill, where good ashlar is obtained in abundance. Chemical works, established in 1830, by Mr. Thomas Coupe, employ 30 hands; and here are also some print-works. The Blackburn and Preston railway runs through, and the Leeds and Liverpool canal skirts, the parish.

The living is a discharged rectory, valued in the king's books at £12. 8. 4., and in the patronage of the Duke of Devonshire: the tithes have been commuted for £500; and there are more than 11 acres of glebe, with a glebe-house and other buildings. The church is in the early English style, with a square tower; the body of the edifice was rebuilt in 1817: in the churchyard is a stone coffin, and in the parsonage, an ancient font. The Roman Catholic chapel here, is dedicated to St. Joseph, and is the property of the Benedictines; it was built in 1786, and is a neat structure, situated in a vale. A free school, supposed to have been founded by Peter Burscough, has funds consisting of about £335, lent on interest, producing £16. 16. per annum; and near the Roman Catholic chapel is a school which was erected by Mr. Joseph Knight, of Chelsea, a native of the parish, with a house for the master and mistress, who receive £25 per annum.

Transcribed from A Topographical Dictionary of England, by Samuel Lewis, 7th edition, published in 1848.

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