Bridestowe (St. Bridget)

BRIDESTOWE (St. Bridget), a parish, in the union of Oakhampton, hundred of Lifton, Lifton and S. divisions of Devon, 6½ miles (S. W.) from Oakhampton; containing 1128 inhabitants. It comprises 3682 acres, of which 2337 are meadow and pasture, 1049 common and moor, and 296 woodland; the soil is on a clay bottom, and the surface hilly, and intersected with some fruitful valleys: the tract of common was originally part of Dartmoor. The village is pleasantly situated on the road to Falmouth, and the surrounding scenery is enlivened by several seats. Fairs for cattle take place on the first Wednesday in June, and July 29th. The living is a rectory, with the living of Sourton annexed, valued in the king's books at £32. 17. 11.; net income, £424; patron, the Bishop of Exeter: the glebe consists of 60 acres, with a corps land annexed comprising several estates, part of which has been disposed of to redeem the land-tax. The church exhibits some Norman details, and is approached by a stately avenue of lime-trees; the tower was rebuilt in 1830, at an expense of £590, and is a handsome embattled structure. On the recent destruction of a very old church which had been converted into a poor-house, a perfect Roman arch was rescued from the ruins, and placed at the entrance of the churchyard. In ploughing a field at Millaton, in the parish, a sepulchral urn of stone, with a human skull, and some silver coins of Richard II., were discovered.

Transcribed from A Topographical Dictionary of England, by Samuel Lewis, 7th edition, published in 1848.

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