Breward, St., or Simonward (St. Bruard)

BREWARD, ST., or Simonward (St. Bruard), a parish, in the union of Camelford, hundred of Trigg, E. division of Cornwall, 6¾ miles (N. by E.) from Bodmin; containing 724 inhabitants. It comprises 9230 acres, of which 2780 are common or waste. The surface is boldly undulated; and the lofty hills of Rough Tor (contracted into Rowtor) and Brown Willy are both within the limits of the parish. From the latter, which is 1368 feet above the level of the sea, a most extensive view is obtained over the English and Bristol Channels; and on the summit of the former are the remains of an ancient building supposed to have been a chapel, and a Logan stone. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at £8, and in the patronage of the Dean and Chapter of Exeter: the tithes have been commuted for £150 payable to the Dean and Chapter, and £290 payable to the vicar, who has also 70 acres of glebe. The church is an ancient structure, partly Norman, and partly in the later style of English architecture. There are some circles of stones in the vicinity of the parish.

Transcribed from A Topographical Dictionary of England, by Samuel Lewis, 7th edition, published in 1848.

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