Bretton, West

BRETTON, WEST, a chapelry, partly in the parish of Sandall Magna, Lower division of the wapentake of Agbrigg, and partly in the parish of Silkstone, wapentake of Staincross, union of Wakefield, W. riding of York, 6 miles (S. S. W.) from Wakefield; containing 564 inhabitants. This place, which is on the Denby-Dale road to Manchester, is the property and residence of Thomas Wentworth Beaumont, Esq., lord of the manor; and comprises by computation 1992 acres, tithe-free, of which 760 are within the limits of the demesne of Bretton Hall. The present Hall was erected by Sir William Wentworth, Bart., in 1730, when the original mansion of the family, with the adjacent chapel, was taken down; considerable additions were made by the late Col. Beaumont and his lady, after designs of Sir Jeffrey Wyatville, and many improvements have been completed by the present proprietor. Henry VIII. and suite slept three nights in the old mansion; and the panels, chairs (the latter of oak, curiously carved), and draperies of his bedroom were removed to the new Hall. The park abounds with sylvan scenery, enlivened by the windings of the river Dearne, which flows through a picturesque valley, and in the southern part of the grounds expands into two beautiful lakes; the upper lake is called Virginia Water, and is surrounded by bold rocky banks, with drives and walks enriched by grottos and Virginian plants. The chapel is a handsome edifice in the Grecian style, built in 1737, by Sir William Wentworth; it is the private property of Mr. Beaumont, who pays the chaplain, but it is open to the public.

Transcribed from A Topographical Dictionary of England, by Samuel Lewis, 7th edition, published in 1848.

Navigation

Preface
A
B
C
D
E
F
G
H
I
J
K
L
M
N
O
P
Q
R
S
T
U
V
W
X
Y
Z