Breage (St. Breage)

BREAGE (St. Breage), a parish, in the union of Helston, W. division of the hundred of Kerrier and of the county of Cornwall, 3 miles (W. by N.) from Helston; containing 6166 inhabitants. The parish is situated on the road from Falmouth to Penzance, and bounded on the south by the sea for nearly seven miles; it abounds in mineral ores, chiefly copper and tin, with some lead and manganese, and zinc. Stone of good quality for building is found in abundance, and Tregonning Hill consists almost entirely of granite, which is extensively quarried; there is also a quarry of chinastone. The number of acres is 7056: the greater portion is profitable land, and in good cultivation; 544 acres are common or waste. A fair for cattle is held on the 18th of June, and there is another fair. The living is a vicarage, with the vicarages of Cury, Germoe, and Gunwalloe annexed, valued in the king's books at £33, and in the patronage of the Crown; impropriators, Mrs. Richards and others. The great and small tithes of Breage have been commuted for £628. 10. and £510 respectively. The church is a handsome structure in the decorated English style, with a square embattled tower. A church district named Godolphin was endowed in 1846 by the Ecclesiastical Commission. There are places of worship for Wesleyans and other denominations of Methodists. The parish contains the remains of Pengersick Castle, consisting of a tower of several stages, with a good stone staircase, supposed to have been built in the time of Henry VII.

Transcribed from A Topographical Dictionary of England, by Samuel Lewis, 7th edition, published in 1848.

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