Brayton (St. Wilfrid)

BRAYTON (St. Wilfrid), a parish, in the union of Selby, Lower division of the wapentake of Barkstone-Ash, W. riding of York; comprising the townships of Barlow, Brayton, Burn, Gateforth, Hambleton, and Thorpe-Willoughby; and containing 1974 inhabitants, of whom 307 are in the township of Brayton, 1 mile (S. W.) from Selby. The parish comprises by measurement 10,690 acres, of which 660 are woodland; it is partly skirted by the river Ouse, and intersected by a canal which connects that river with the Aire. The soil is principally of a sandy nature, but its quality varies, and in some parts it is of a reddish cast; the surface is generally level. Brayton Barf and Hambleton Haugh, two noted hills, covered with trees, are conspicuous objects in this flat district, and are seen at a great distance. The Leeds and Selby railway passes through the parish, one of its stations being at Hambleton. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at £7. 14. 4½.; net income, £268; patrons, the Hon. E. R. Petre and the Prebendary of Wistow, the former of whom is impropriator: the glebe comprises 140 acres, with a good residence. The church exhibits various styles of architecture: the tower is Norman, and is surmounted by an octagonal lantern, from which rises a lofty spire in the later English style; the south doorway, and the arch leading into the chancel, are Norman, highly enriched; the chancel is in the decorated, and the nave in the later, English style. At Barlow, three miles from the parish church, is a small chapel, a plain brick building, rather ancient; there is also a chapel at Gateforth.

Transcribed from A Topographical Dictionary of England, by Samuel Lewis, 7th edition, published in 1848.

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