Braunston, anciently Brandeston (All Saints)

BRAUNSTON, anciently Brandeston (All Saints), a parish, in the union of Daventry, hundred of Fawsley, S. division of the county of Northampton, 2¾ miles (N. W.) from Daventry; containing 1469 inhabitants. The parish comprises by computation 2962 acres, and the small brook Leam separates it from Warwickshire: the road from Daventry to Coventry, forming part of the Holyhead road, passes through it; and the Oxford and Grand Junction canals unite here. The village, which once consisted of two detached portions, called Great and Little Braunston, commands, from the brow of a steep declivity, an extensive opening into Warwickshire. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £31. 2. 11.; net income, £837; patrons, the Principal and Fellows of Jesus College, Oxford. About 390 acres of land were assigned in lieu of tithes, in 1766; and there is an excellent glebe-house, lately erected. The church is in the decorated English style, consisting of a nave, north and south aisles, and chancel, with a handsome square embattled tower, crowned with pinnacles at the angles, and surmounted by a crocketed octangular spire, rising to the height of 150 feet: standing on a bank, the edifice forms a fine feature in the country, visible for many miles round. There are places of worship for Calvinistic Baptists and Wesleyans; and a national school is supported partly by an endowment of £29 per annum, arising from land bequeathed by Mr. William Makepeace in 1733. A pit on the side of the old road to Daventry has produced a large number and variety of organic remains, and an almost complete series of rocky stratifications; and some very scarce plants have been found in the parish. Dr. Edward Reynolds, Bishop of Norwich, and an able political writer, was incumbent here.

Transcribed from A Topographical Dictionary of England, by Samuel Lewis, 7th edition, published in 1848.

Navigation

Preface
A
B
C
D
E
F
G
H
I
J
K
L
M
N
O
P
Q
R
S
T
U
V
W
X
Y
Z