Brassington

BRASSINGTON, a chapelry, in the parish of Bradborne, hundred of Wirksworth, S. division of the county of Derby, 3¾ miles (W. by N.) from Wirksworth; containing 776 inhabitants. One of two manors here belonged, at the time of the Domesday survey, to Henry de Ferrers, and passed to the Nevills, Talbots, and various other families. The second manor, called the King's or the Duchy manor, from having been parcel of the duchy of Lancaster, was granted in 1630 by Charles I. to Charles Harbord and others, by whom it was conveyed, shortly afterwards, to the Pegge and Lees families; it subsequently passed, in moieties, to the Lowes, Haynes, Newtons, &c. The chapelry is situated on the road from Hognaston to Winster, and a short distance south of the Cromford canal. The living is a perpetual curacy; net income, £87; patron and impropriator, John Bainbrigge Story, Esq., of Lockington Hall. The chapel exhibits various styles, from the Norman to the later English. A plot of about five acres of land, given by Thurston Dale, in 1742, is now in the occupation of a schoolmaster, who instructs twelve children free in a national school.

Transcribed from A Topographical Dictionary of England, by Samuel Lewis, 7th edition, published in 1848.

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