Bramshaw (St. Peter)

BRAMSHAW (St. Peter), a parish, in the union of New Forest, partly in the hundred of Cawden and Cadworth, Salisbury and Amesbury, and S. divisions of Wilts, but chiefly in the N. division of the hundred of New Forest, Romsey and S. divisions of the county of Southampton, 3 miles (N.) from Stony Cross; containing, with the hamlets of Furzley and Brook, and the extra-parochial places of Eyeworth-Lodge and Amberwood-Cottage, 793 inhabitants, of whom 474 are in the county of Southampton. The parish comprises by measurement 3560 acres, and is intersected by the road from Southampton to Salisbury. In that portion of the New Forest which lies on its borders to the south-east, William Rufus was killed by an arrow, shot by Walter Tyrrell at a stag, but which, glancing by the animal, struck the royal breast, and occasioned the monarch's death: a stone, erected on the spot where the oak-tree stood whence the arrow was shot, commemorates the event. The living is a vicarage, described in the king's books as not in charge; patrons and appropriators, the Dean and Chapter of Salisbury. The rectorial tithes have been commuted for £149, and the vicarial for £60; there are about 20 acres of glebe, a portion of which is in Lyndhurst. The vicarage-house was erected in 1841, in lieu of a former one supposed to be more than 300 years old. Of the ancient church, which stands upon an eminence, and overlooks a considerable portion of the New Forest, the nave alone is standing; the east end, and north and south aisles, being entirely new: in the building of these latter portions, in 1829, some very grotesque heads were found inclosed in the old walls. There are places of worship for Calvinists and Wesleyans.

Transcribed from A Topographical Dictionary of England, by Samuel Lewis, 7th edition, published in 1848.

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