Brampton-Bryan (St. Barnabas)

BRAMPTON-BRYAN (St. Barnabas), a parish, in the union of Knighton, partly in the hundred of Knighton, county of Radnor, South Wales, but chiefly in the hundred of Wigmore, county of Hereford, 10 miles (W. by S.) from Ludlow; containing, in the English portion, with the township of Boresford with Pedwardine, 250 inhabitants. The parish comprises about 3000 acres, of which 1200 are arable, 1470 pasture, and 330 woodland; and is bounded on the north by the river Teme, and intersected by the road from Ludlow to Knighton. The village was nearly destroyed in the parliamentary war; the castle, also, was burnt by the royalists in 1643, and is now a ruin, consisting chiefly of an arched gateway flanked by two circular towers, and fragments of the outer walls. Sir Robert de Harley obtained this castle and estate in the reign of Edward II., by marriage with the coheiress of Sir Bryan de Brampton; and it has since continued in that noble family. A great fair for horned-cattle, horses, and sheep, is held on June 22nd. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £5. 11. 0½., and in the gift of the Earl of Oxford: the tithes have been commuted for £345, and there are 16 acres of glebe. The church, which was destroyed in 1643, was rebuilt in 1650, and is a plain edifice, containing 350 sittings, of which 150 are free: the Earl of Oxford, lord treasurer, was buried here. About a mile from the church is Coxwall Knoll, on the summit of which are vestiges of a camp anciently occupied by the brave Caractacus, and now overgrown with oak-trees: a brass celt, either British or Roman, was found at Litton in 1843. A school is endowed with property given by the second Earl of Oxford in 1720, amounting to £18 per annum.

Transcribed from A Topographical Dictionary of England, by Samuel Lewis, 7th edition, published in 1848.

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