Bramley

BRAMLEY, a chapelry, in the parish of St. Peter, liberty of the borough of Leeds, W. riding of York, 4 miles (W. N. W.) from Leeds; containing 8875 inhabitants. It is on the Leeds and Halifax road, and comprises by computation 2387 acres. The substratum abounds with slate of good quality, and with freestone of great firmness of texture, in high repute for building, and of which large quantities are sent to most of the principal towns in the kingdom, by the Leeds and Liverpool canal, which passes through the township, and connects the two great ports of Liverpool and Hull. The village is pleasantly situated near the new Stanningley road, on a boldly undulated and richly wooded eminence, overlooking Airedale; it is nearly a mile in length, built chiefly of stone, and, viewed in connexion with the scenery of the vale beneath, has a very imposing aspect. The inhabitants are chiefly employed in the manufacture of woollen-cloth, for which there are not less than twenty large mills in full operation in the village and adjacent hamlets, Stanningley, Rodley, Newlay, and White Cote; many are also engaged in the freestone quarries of Bramley Fall, on the south side of the river Aire. The chapel, supposed to have been originally founded by the monks of Kirkstall Abbey, has undergone so many alterations, that little of its ancient character remains; it was enlarged in 1833, when a spire was added to it, at an expense of £700, raised by subscription. The living is a perpetual curacy, in the patronage of the Vicar of Leeds, with a net income of £289. A church, dedicated to St. Thomas, has been erected at Stanningley, which see. The great tithes of the chapelry have been commuted for £100, and the small for £15. There are places of worship for Baptists, Primitive Methodists, and Wesleyans.

Transcribed from A Topographical Dictionary of England, by Samuel Lewis, 7th edition, published in 1848.

Navigation

Preface
A
B
C
D
E
F
G
H
I
J
K
L
M
N
O
P
Q
R
S
T
U
V
W
X
Y
Z