Bramham (All Saints)

BRAMHAM (All Saints), a parish, in the Upper division of the wapentake of Barkstone-Ash, W. riding of York; comprising the townships of Bramham-with-Oglethorpe and Clifford, with the modern village of Boston; and containing 2760 inhabitants, of whom 1194 are in the township of Bramham-with-Oglethorpe, 4¼ miles (S. S. E.) from Wetherby. A battle was fought here in 1408, between Sir Thomas Rokeby, sheriff of Yorkshire, and the Earl of Northumberland, in which the earl was defeated and slain, and by which the possession of the county was secured to Henry IV. The extensive village of Bramham is pleasantly situated in the vale of a small rivulet, on the great north road; the neighbourhood is undulated, and abounds with rich and beautiful scenery. There are good stone-quarries for building and other purposes. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at £6. 7. 6.; net income, £159; patrons and appropriators, the Dean and Canons of Christ-Church, Oxford. The church is an ancient and elegant structure, in the decorated English style. There are chapels, forming separate incumbencies, at Boston and Clifford; and places of worship in the parish for Wesleyans and Ranters. Visible remains of the Watling-street exist on Bramham Moor, a mile north of the village: from the middle of this moor is an extensive prospect of a well-cultivated district, which abounds with freestone, limestone, and coal.

Transcribed from A Topographical Dictionary of England, by Samuel Lewis, 7th edition, published in 1848.

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