Bradshaw

BRADSHAW, a chapelry, in the parish and union of Bolton, hundred of Salford, S. division of the county of Lancaster, 2 miles (N. E.) from Bolton; containing 827 inhabitants. The family of Bradshaw were seated here in the 16th century, and of this family was John Bradshaw, who presided at the trial of Charles I., and was subsequently chancellor of the duchy of Lancaster. The township is situated on the east bank of the Bradshaw brook, which separates it from Turton and Harwood; and on the road from Bolton to Burnley. It comprises 1380 acres; the surface is undulated, and the scenery picturesque, and enriched with several good plantations: the land is chiefly in pasture. A colliery and a stone-quarry are in operation. The bleach and print works of Messrs. Callender, Bickham, and Company, employ 500 hands; and there are also two cotton-mills at work. Bradshaw Hall, an irregular building embosomed in trees, affords a beautiful specimen of the style of architecture that prevailed in the early part of the seventeenth century; and the arms of the Bradshaws are still to be seen, both in the stained glass of the window, and cut on stone over the hall-door. The living is a perpetual curacy; net income, £150; patron, the Vicar of Bolton. The chapel was rebuilt in 1847. There is a small Baptist place of worship; and a school-house is let rent-free to a master. President Bradshaw was the son of Henry Bradshaw, and of Catherine, daughter and coheiress of Ralph Winnington, of Offerton. He was baptized at Stockport, December 10th, 1602; married Mary, the daughter of Thomas Marbury, of Marbury, in the county of Chester; and died (without issue) December 16th, 1659, just before the Restoration, thus escaping the fate of other members of the "High Court of Justice" which condemned the unfortunate Charles to the scaffold.

Transcribed from A Topographical Dictionary of England, by Samuel Lewis, 7th edition, published in 1848.

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