Bradfield

BRADFIELD, a parochial chapelry, in the parish of Ecclesfield, union of Wortley, N. division of the wapentake of Strafforth and Tickhill, W. riding of York, 6¾ miles (N. W. by W.) from Sheffield; containing 6318 inhabitants. It comprises about 33,700 acres, in a mountainous part of the county, and lying between the river Don and the borders of Derbyshire; the Loxley, the Ewden, and several smaller streams wind through it in various directions. The district abounds with slate, flag, and fire and building stone. Game abounds on the moors, and is strictly preserved. Fairs are held on June 17th and December 9th. The living is a perpetual curacy, with a net income of £186, and in the patronage of the Vicar of Ecclesfield, who, with the curate of Bradfield and others, has the impropriation. The chapel was repewed about 1800, by the feoffees of sundry parcels of land consisting of about 250 acres, appropriated by a decree of the Commissioners of Charitable Uses, 13th James I., for the repairs of the chapel and defraying the expenses attending the celebration of divine service, being such as are usually discharged by a church-rate: the income is about £170 per annum. There are district churches at Oughtibridge, Stainington, and Wadsley, and chapels at Bolsterstone and Midhope; also several places of worship for dissenters. Near the chapel is a Saxon camp in a very perfect state, and on the moors are several Druidical remains: many Roman coins have also been found.

Transcribed from A Topographical Dictionary of England, by Samuel Lewis, 7th edition, published in 1848.

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