Bradbury

BRADBURY, a township, in the parish and union of Sedgefield, N. E. division of Stockton ward, S. division of the county of Durham, 2½ miles (E.) from Rushyford, and 10½ (S. by E.) from Durham; containing 167 inhabitants. Mr. Cade, the antiquary, considered the name of this place to be a corruption of Brimesbury, where King Athelstan encamped in 937, when he gained a decisive victory over the Danes; but it is more probable that the battle was fought at Bramby, in Lincolnshire. The township is bounded on the south-east by the river Skerne, which separates it from the parish of Great Aycliffe; and comprises 2043 acres, in equal portions of arable and pasture: the surface is rather level, pretty well wooded, and presents almost every variety of soil. £3000 have recently been expended in effectually draining the marshes, which promise to become good grazing-land. The York and Newcastle railway runs through the township for two miles. Here was a chapel of ease dedicated to St. Nicholas, of which there are no vestiges; the curate's house is still standing. The tithes have been commuted for £233; and there is a glebe of 63 acres.

Transcribed from A Topographical Dictionary of England, by Samuel Lewis, 7th edition, published in 1848.

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