Bowling

BOWLING, a chapelry, in the parish and union of Bradford, wapentake of Morley, W. riding of York, 1 mile (S. E.) from Bradford; containing 8918 inhabitants. The township is situated on the slope of a hill on the east side of Low Moor, and comprises by computation 1438 acres, of which by far the greater portion is pasture; the surface is varied, and the surrounding scenery in some parts enlivened with plantations. Boiling or Bowling Hall is a stately and spacious mansion of venerable aspect. The substratum abounds with coal and iron-ore, which have been wrought for more than half a century by the Bowling Iron Company, whose works here are among the most extensive in England: the accumulated heaps of refuse from the mines, forming huge mounds surrounding the excavations, have been planted with trees. The village consists chiefly of one long street, rising by a gradual ascent from the town of Bradford to Dudley Hill, on the Wakefield road; the houses are of stone and well built, and there are numerous clusters of modern cottages inhabited chiefly by persons employed in the iron-works. The chapel, dedicated to St. John, and consecrated in Feb. 1842, was erected at the sole expense of the Iron Company, at a cost of £4000; it is a handsome structure in the later English style, with a square embattled tower and wellproportioned spire, and contains 1000 sittings, of which 300 are free. The living is a perpetual curacy; net income, £150; patron, the Vicar of Bradford. There are places of worship for Primitive Methodists and Wesleyans.

Transcribed from A Topographical Dictionary of England, by Samuel Lewis, 7th edition, published in 1848.

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