Boughton-under-Blean (St. Peter and St. Paul)

BOUGHTON-under-Blean (St. Peter and St. Paul), a parish, in the union of Faversham, hundred of Boughton-under-Blean, lathe of Scray, E. division of Kent, 3 miles (S. E. by E.) from Faversham; containing 1373 inhabitants. This place derives its distinguishing epithet from the adjacent forest of Blean, which was anciently the haunt of wild boars, wolves, and other beasts of chace; but the description applies more particularly to the situation of that part of the parish which is now called South-street. The parish comprises 2349a. 3r. 27p.; 1220 acres are arable, 274 meadow, 161 pasture, 109 wood, 262 in hops, 209 in orchards, 18 occupied by homesteads, and 45 in gardens. Boughton-street is on elevated ground, and was not built till after the formation of the present high road to Canterbury, through the king's forest of Blean, before which time the old Watling-street crossed the river Stour at Shalmsford bridge, and entered Canterbury near the castle. A fair for toys and pedlery is held on the Monday after St. Peter's day. The living is a vicarage, valued in the king's books at £9. 4. 9½.; net income, £300; patron, the Archbishop of Canterbury; appropriators, the Dean and Chapter. The church contains several ancient monuments, and its internal architecture is of a pleasing character; the spire fell down about the close of the sixteenth century. There is a place of worship for Wesleyans. About 28 acres of land, and other considerable charities, have been bequeathed for the benefit of the poor. In 1716, a human skeleton, by the side of which lay a sword and a brass coin struck in the reign of Antoninus Pius, was dug up.

Transcribed from A Topographical Dictionary of England, by Samuel Lewis, 7th edition, published in 1848.

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