Boughton, Great

BOUGHTON, GREAT, a township, and the head of a union, in the parish of St. Oswald, Chester, Lower division of the hundred of Broxton, S. division of the county of Chester; containing 949 inhabitants. This place was given by Hugh Lupus to the convent of St. Werburgh; it came, in the reign of Edward VI., to Sir Richard Cotton, who parcelled it out among several fee farmers. The principal mansion, with its demesne, was for some generations vested in a younger branch of the Davenport family, from whom it passed by female heirs to the family of Currie. The township comprises 731 acres. It is intersected by two turnpike-roads to Chester, one from Whitchurch, and the other from Nantwich; and near their junction has been formed a considerable village, which unites with one of the streets of Chester. The Chester and Nantwich canal, and the Chester and Crewe railway, also pass through it; and the river Dee adjoins on the west. Across the middle of the township stretches a belt of deep rich loam, which, from its proximity to Chester, lets at a high rate for garden-ground; the rest is a clayey soil, held by milkmen, butchers, &c. The poor law union of Great Boughton comprises 99 parishes or places, of which 96 are in Cheshire, and 3 in the county of Flint, North Wales; and contains a population of 49,085.

Transcribed from A Topographical Dictionary of England, by Samuel Lewis, 7th edition, published in 1848.

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