Boston

BOSTON, a village, forming with Clifford a township, in the parish of Bramham, Upper division of the wapentake of Barkstone-Ash, W. riding of York, 3 miles (S. S. E.) from Wetherby; containing 1566 inhabitants, of whom 1014 are in Boston. This large and commanding village is of recent growth. It arose in consequence of the discovery, in 1744, of a mineral spring here, which was called Thorp-Arch Spa on account of Thorp-Arch, in the vicinity, affording the nearest accommodation for visiters, before the building of the village of Boston, where the first house was erected in 1753. The water is of a saline taste, of a slightly sulphureous smell, and possessed of purgative and diuretic qualities: it is taken in larger quantities than the Harrogate water, and is efficacious in cases of general relaxation, bilious and dyspeptic complaints, and glandular obstructions. For the accommodation of the visiters to this place of fashionable resort, there is a pump-room, with hot and cold baths, the conveniences of which, together with the salubrity of the air, and the situation of the spot, in a valley, on the southern side of the river Wharfe (the village communicating with Thorp Arch by a good stone bridge), contribute greatly to increase the sanative effect of the spa water. The powers of the county debt-court of Boston, established in 1847, extend over the registration-district of Tadcaster, and the townships of Linton and Wetherby. A chapel, a neat plain building, erected on land given by Mr. Samuel Tate, was consecrated in 1815: the living is a perpetual curacy; net income, £146; patron, the Vicar of Bramham. There is a place of worship for Wesleyans.—See Clifford.

Transcribed from A Topographical Dictionary of England, by Samuel Lewis, 7th edition, published in 1848.

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