Boreham (St. Andrew)

BOREHAM (St. Andrew), a parish, in the union and hundred of Chelmsford, S. division of Essex, 4 miles (N. E. by E.) from Chelmsford; containing 1034 inhabitants. This parish derives its name from the Saxon Bore, "a market," and Ham, "a village;" and is supposed to have been anciently a place of considerable importance. The land is generally elevated; the soil is fertile though varying in quality, and the general appearance is greatly enriched with wood, which seems to have been formerly more abundant than at present. New Hall, in the parish, is part of a much larger mansion greatly adorned by Henry VIII., who having obtained the manor in exchange for other property, raised it into an honour: his daughter, the Princess Mary, also resided here for several years. It is now occupied by a society of English nuns, who were driven from Liege by the fury of the French republicans, and who now superintend the education of about eighty young ladies. The village is pleasantly situated on the road to Colchester; and the Chelmer navigation bounds the parish on the south. The living is a vicarage, valued in the king's books at £10. 3. 9., and in the patronage of the Bishop of London: the impropriate tithes have been commuted for £680, and the vicarial for £440; there are 21 acres of glebe belonging to the impropriator, and 18 to the vicar. The church is a handsome edifice, consisting of a nave, with north and south aisles, and a chancel, between which and the nave rises a lofty square embattled tower; the south aisle was added by Sir Thomas Radcliffe, and contains an elegant monument with statues of Robert, first Earl of Sussex, his son, and grandson.

Transcribed from A Topographical Dictionary of England, by Samuel Lewis, 7th edition, published in 1848.

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