Bordesley

BORDESLEY, a hamlet and chapelry, in the parish and union of Aston, Birmingham division of the hundred of Hemlingford, N. division of the county of Warwick, adjoining the town of Birmingham, and containing 10,754 inhabitants. In the civil war of the seventeenth century, this was the scene of a skirmish between the army of Prince Rupert, who, in 1643, was sent to open a communication between Oxford and York, and a party of the parliamentarians, who, assisted by the inhabitants of Birmingham, had intrenched themselves at a place since called Camp Hill, in order to intercept his progress. During the Birmingham riots in 1791, Bordesley Hall was burnt by the mob. The hamlet was originally inconsiderable, consisting only of a few scattered dwelling-houses, one of which, now remaining at Camp Hill, is of timber frame-work and plaster, with projecting upper stories; but, from its proximity to Birmingham, Bordesley has become an integral part of that town, and partakes largely in its trade, manufactures, and public institutions. It is pleasantly situated on the turnpike-roads to Coventry and Warwick, and contains some handsome continuous ranges of houses, and numerous detached mansions, inhabited by families of opulence connected with Birmingham. On the road leading to Coventry is an extensive establishment for staining, colouring, and marbling paper, in which the process, though facilitated by machinery worked by steam, affords employment to a considerable number of persons. The Birmingham canal, on the banks of which are various works, traverses the hamlet; and the Gloucester railway passes through it in its progress to join the London and Birmingham line.

A church dedicated to the Holy Trinity was built in 1822, at an expense of £14,235, raised by subscription of the inhabitants, aided by a grant from the Parliamentary Commissioners; it is in the later English style, combining a rich variety of architectural details. The living is a perpetual curacy; patron, the Vicar of Aston. In 1846, a district, or ecclesiastical parish, was formed of part of the hamlet, under the act 6 and 7 Victoria, cap. 37, by the name of St. Andrew's, Bordesley; and a church was consecrated the same year. The edifice is in the decorated style, and is neat and substantial, consisting of a nave, chancel, and aisle, with an engaged tower surmounted by a spire; the cost was about £4000, and was defrayed by a Church Building Society. The patronage of the benefice is in the Bishop of Worcester and five Trustees, alternately; the income, £150, is a grant by the Ecclesiastical Commissioners. In the hamlet are twelve almshouses for aged persons, built by Mr. Dowell, whose widow appoints the inmates: one of the houses is appropriated as a chapel.

Transcribed from A Topographical Dictionary of England, by Samuel Lewis, 7th edition, published in 1848.

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