Bolton-upon-Dearne (St. Andrew)

BOLTON-upon-Dearne (St. Andrew), a parish, in the union of Doncaster, N. division of the wapentake of Strafforth and Tickhill, W. riding of York, 7¼ miles (N. by E.) from Rotherham, and upon the road from Doncaster to Barnsley; containing 671 inhabitants. At the time of the Conquest here was a church, with its attendant priest; also a mill; and the country appears to have been in a higher state of cultivation than the lands around. The place became the residence of several families of some consideration, and seems to have been from early times a rich and flourishing spot. It lies on the line of road traced by those who consider that a Roman road existed from Templeborough to Castleford; and it is certain there was a bridge over the Dearne here at a remote period, the pontage of which was early a subject of dispute, as is recorded in the Hundred rolls. The parish comprises by measurement 2400 acres, of which about one-third is grass, and the remainder arable: the soil is various, in some parts a strong clay, in others a light sand; and the substratum abounds with excellent sandstone, which is extensively quarried. The village is beautifully situated on the northern acclivities of the vale of Dearne, having a good bridge over the river, said to occupy the site of a Roman ford; and about a mile northward is the pleasant hamlet of Goldthorpe. A statute-fair for hiring servants is held on the second Thursday in November. The living is a perpetual curacy, valued in the king's books at £6. 15. 5.; net income, £88; patrons, the Executors of the late W. H. Marsden, Esq., in whom are vested the impropriate tithes, which have been commuted for £580. The church is an ancient edifice, chiefly in the Norman style, with a tower at the west end. There is a place of worship for Wesleyans.

Transcribed from A Topographical Dictionary of England, by Samuel Lewis, 7th edition, published in 1848.

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