Bolton-Castle

BOLTON-CASTLE, a chapelry, in the parish of Wensley, union of Leyburn, wapentake of Hang-West, N. riding of York, 7¼ miles (N. W. by W.) from Middleham; containing 230 inhabitants. On the brow of a hill are the ruins of a castle built by Richard, Lord Scrope, chancellor of England in the reign of Richard II., and endowed with £106. 15. 4. per annum, for a chantry of six chaplains. Mary, Queen of Scots, was kept a prisoner here for about two years, and was removed hence to Tutbury in 1569; she inscribed her name on a pane of glass, which was removed to Bolton Hall a few years since. During the parliamentary war, the castle was defended for the king by Colonel Scrope and a party of the Richmondshire militia, and sustained a pressing siege, which terminated in its surrender to the insurgents in 1645. The north-eastern tower fell down in 1761, and the eastern and northern sides are entirely in ruins; the west front is in good repair. The living is a perpetual curacy, with that of Redmire annexed; net income, £115; patron, the Rector of Wensley. The chapel is dedicated to St. Oswald.

Transcribed from A Topographical Dictionary of England, by Samuel Lewis, 7th edition, published in 1848.

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